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WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

Comedian Marc Maron is tackling the most complex philosophical question of our day - WTF? He'll get to the bottom of it with help from comedian friends, celebrity guests and the voices in his own head.
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WTF with Marc Maron Podcast
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Now displaying: Page 1
Sep 20, 2010 8

When you think of Bob Saget, you generally don't think of white-hot blind rage, but Bob says he's working really hard on his anger issues. He and Marc will compare anger management notes in addition to discussing the roles Bob is most known for and why they're so different from the Bob that nobody really knows.

8 Comments
  • over four years ago
    andrew h
    Hey Marc, not sure if it's a mental block because you had a bad experience on a roast, but if you get another comedy central roast comedian on, please talk about them, they are hilarious!
  • over four years ago
    Matt
    The interesting thing about this show is that Marc is so damn real. And so are his guests, usually, as evidenced by the Robin Williams episode. Contrast that with Bob Saget's remarks in this interview. Bob was very guarded and rarely went beyond his comedic persona. That's a shame. I think Marc was trying to draw out Bob's real personality, but Bob was stuck on late night talk show banter.
  • over four years ago
    RB
    You deserve some time to relax, Marc. Enjoy it!

    Bob's documentary sounds interesting and original. I look forward to seeing it when it airs.
  • over four years ago
    Steven Doyle
    "To thine own self be true" -- seriously, Marc, you thought that was in the Bible? Brush up your Shakespeare, Dude.
  • over four years ago
    Steven Doyle
    Great 'cast! I never watched "Full House" or that video show, so most of my exposure to Bob Saget is his grown-up comedy.

    Yeah, The Laughing Skull is a small room. Glad I saw you there last November; sorry I couldn't make it this last time.
  • over four years ago
    gurthang
    "A Gentle Way to Make You Pay"

    Please just take my wallet and remove what that's worth!
  • over four years ago
    kylen
    hey marc,
    "to thy own self be true" was from hamlet and "know thyself" is just a greek aphorism which i don't think has been officially attributed to jesus. not that the origin of the phrase detracts from what you and bob were takling about.
    another great show, thanks so much for putting these out there into the universe.
  • over four years ago
    Tim from Canada
    Good episode, particularly the parts where Saget discusses suicide and his understanding of Louie CK's new show.

    At the end the "Know thyself" quote was mentioned but not fully explained. I've always been intrigued by the quote, so if anybody's interested this is the source:

    "Know thyself" is an ancient Greek saying. It was inscribed on stone outside the Temple to Apollo at Delphi. That's where the Oracle used to tell the future. Socrates, the first philosopher to reflect fundamental Metaphysical questions back at humanity, used it as his motto. Platonic philosophy in general "recollects" truth by looking back into your own mind for answers.

    Much later, philosophers like Nietzsche, Kierkegaard and Foucault re-examined the adage more critically. To "know yourself" requires you to view yourself objectively and -- in modern empiricism -- scientifically. In other words, to turn yourself into an object of study. This would require bifrication between the subjective self and the objective self. How can that even be possible?

    I think "Know thyself" has a new contemporary meaning that is worth examining in the context of the overall psychoanalytical reflective theme of Marc Maron's podcast -- that is his project of curing his anger, anxiety, and fear. To take it further, our culture has a new and very unique type of individualism which is constantly evaluated and pathologizing itself.

    Am I crazy? Am I healthy? Am I fat? Do I fit in here? AM I NORMAL?

    These questions are new. They might be rooted in the catholic confessionals and the "repression" of 19th century Europe, but they are completely modern and Western. This self confession and pathology was not present in the roots of our individualism. Renaissance aristocrats didn't have to overcome their anger. Ancient Greeks didn't have anxiety problems.

    Maybe the lack of this type of self reflection is why Marc's type of comedy doesn't go over in other cultures.

    Anyways, just something to think about.