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WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

Comedian Marc Maron is tackling the most complex philosophical question of our day - WTF? He'll get to the bottom of it with help from comedian friends, celebrity guests and the voices in his own head.
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WTF with Marc Maron Podcast
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Now displaying: Page 1
Sep 2, 2010 13

Continuing his conversation with writer/producer/director Judd Apatow, Marc finds out how hands-on Judd is as a producer, whether Judd is happy with the way his movie Funny People turned out, what are his favorite comedies, and whether or not showbusiness brings him joy.

13 Comments
  • three and a half years ago
    Kara Marx
    Thank you, Jennie. It seems the arts of respect and appreciation for other humans have been largely lost to many. There is a difference between genuflecting for show and genuinely acknowledging and giving due approbation to someone you admire. We who are in the comedic arena are especially keyed to sense disingenuousness. If Marc were "kissing arse", the people he interviews would know it, we would know it, and Marc would know it. There is courage these days in being positive about anything at all, it seems, since moments of sincerity are so quickly met with ridicule.
  • three and a half years ago
    Jennie Marie
    Geez...I don't understand Joe Tilly's comment above. Kissing arse?? Marc's having a real converstation. And he's enjoying the conversation. I don't wanna speak for him...well, yes, I do. This guy doesn't kiss arse. I love how Judd expresses that his movies and his life come down to connection with other people. I thought this was a very honest conversation. I loved it.
  • three and a half years ago
    Kathryn
    As a community college English teacher and humorist poet, I almost pissed my undies when Judd mentioned several of my favorite writers in his selections for McSweeny's. Tony Hoagland is one of my favorite contemporary poets and it made me very glad tp hear that someone in Hollywood and contemporary comedy is reading such good stuff. Can't wait to grab that book. Maybe I'll use it for one of my classes.
  • three and a half years ago
    American Pundit Fighting
    I disagree with the "descended into obsequious waffle" part. Its good to show some appreciation for one's work, Marc hasn't been afraid to critique work when necessary.

    Part of Marc's appeal is that he is marginal, or more to the point seemingly burdened by the fear that he is marginal. Whatever that means. So when he talks to people he and we collectively would consider having "made it". It makes for good conversation.

    Because as we've all come to know. No matter what you have or haven't got we're all searching for the meaning of life and contentment. Noone really has the answers and no amount of fame or success can really extinguish the angst. The search will always go on.
  • three and a half years ago
    Joe Tily
    Have to agree with Mike in Maine - i like WTF much better when Marc isn't kissing arse! I loved the first part but this one descended into obsequious waffle, just like the Ben Stiller episode.
  • three and a half years ago
    Gloria
    I have to agree with "lower-case" mike that prank calls are just stupid, and Apatow's apparent love of Adam Sandler diminishes my respect for him. Hard to believe that someone who could make an incredibly funny-yet-gentle movie like 40 YO Virgin would actually like that shit.

    Great podcast, as always.
  • three and a half years ago
    Scott
    Apatow wrote a 30-page paper about Groucho Marx when he was in sixth-grade just because he wanted to write it? He conned his way into interviews with the likes of Seinfeld at age 16? Seems like a prodigy, not a guy who just got lucky. Thanks for breaking all that down. It's easier to understand where a lot of his genius and influence derives.
  • three and a half years ago
    Morie
    Incredible podcast. I actually enjoyed this one much more than Part. 1, because you guys delved into some pretty heavy shit about yourselves and where you both are, psychologically.
  • three and a half years ago
    Nick
    My favorite episode so far. Very cool, Marc
  • three and a half years ago
    Thad P.
    I'm sure Future Marc will be able to attest to Brad in Ohio's statement.
  • three and a half years ago
    Todd Mason
    I liked the flow of the warmed-up conversation in part 2 better, even without, or because of the lack of interruption by, the interesting archival bits.

    By the time of A MIDSUMMER NIGHT'S SEX COMEDY, it had become obvious to me (and I'm about the same age as Marc) that Woody Allen resented women to an unusual degree (and it still strikes me as strange how many women will insist the opposite), inasmuch as the women in his films were almost always portrayed as fools (and all the women in minor parts were) for not seeing past his characers' physical unattractiveness and tics to love the basic Woody Allen guy in his Specialness...meanwhile, the women (and certainly the leading women) were always conventionally attractive, very much including the teenaged Hemingway his middle-aged character is dating in MANHATTAN, of course.

    And if it helps any, none of your colleagues who are doing podcasts know how to gracefully wrap an episode either...the closest anyone comes consistently has been the team including Eddie Pepitone. And they not that close.
  • three and a half years ago
    Mike in Maine
    I love Marc and I'm a longtime fan pre WTF, but I find Marc to be more interesting when he's not interviewing uber famous people. Judd, yeah, nice guy, but so what?
  • three and a half years ago
    Brad in Ohio
    In the future, these will be covered in college courses about modern comedy.